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? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america, and around the globe. inflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military -- conflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military intervention in syria. in muted remarks, the president insisted no decision had been made, and any action would be limited and narrow. is america going to attack the assad regime, and when? mark mardell starts our coverage. in a damascus suburb, witnessed second hand by the whole world is a challenge for america and its presid
this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years,and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i think this is the number one sold on amazon.com and it is riveting to show how does organization has managed to infiltrate into various capitals throughout the western world and it has managed to come under the obama administration, metastasize and so without any further ado i would like to introduce you to a wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank you for hosting this event. i look at sera as a modern-day esther or deborah. such a time as this. thank you for having me here. if you write a book, you spend a year with that and say this book can put me through pack. but i think that people are reading it. it gets into detail about the main player in the arab spring, which i refers to as the islamist winter in the butt. the muslim brotherhood is done, out of power in egypt, we don't have to worry about them. this is the postmortem of history. it has been has the muslim brotherhood, the leaders were killed and imprisoned in the group was banned for decades. the headquarters was burned to the ground. c
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
transformed america. she lives in williamstown, massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, she's a great friend of the library and me as well, but james mcgreggor burns is the dean of scholars writing the first two full editions of radio vet's biography yearings ago, and he's watching the prasm later. we want to send the best to him in massachusetts. [applause] with that, pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] have you seen "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of al fred hitchcock or joel mccia, but you may know them. "foreign correspondent" debuted in the summer of 1940, and in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question, what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis, says the reporter, played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that, well, to tell you the truth, i've not begin it much thought. you don't keep up with the foreign news, do you? well how would you li
is the history of the american people, and in that book, you write that america still is the best hope for the human race. >> yes. i think that is still true, though since i published that book, other countries have been catching up on the united states in terms of economic output, particularly communist china, and in my opinion, america will remain the top nation for the indefinite future, and the reason i say that is because of the united states is a very free country. in many wayings, the freest country in the world, and freedom means that you can interchange ideas and develop ideas and create ideas and it's ideas in the long run that keep one nation ahead of another. the ability to produce striking new ideas. i think the united states still has that capacity, and therefore, will survive as the world's top nation. >> host: well, recently, two books you published on darwin and socrates. how did darwin become charles darwin? >> guest: well, he was a man who could be his own master were the simple reason he inherited a lot of money. he came from a distinguished family of doctors and ot
." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington, i am katty kay. says that if his country is attacked he will defend himself. if this happens, what kind of effect may this have? >> the horrific aftermath of an attack carried out allegedly by the syrian government using an incendiary bomb. we have this exclusive report. cuba is back in the ring after banning professional boxing for half a century. the punching is flying once again. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the globe. in washington, new york and london, there have been a series of tense meetings on syria. presidentt jet -- obama has briefed john boehner, and david cameron is talking to parliament. russia has called a meeting of the security council. no decision has been made but with a threat looming, president assad says that syria will defend itself. the syrian people are increasingly nervous as we report from damascus. it feels as if something big is coming to damascus. the supporters of president assad paraded on the hotel, outside of the where the u.n. inspectors and foreign c
the way he saw america's potential relationship with all these middle east countries the word is reciprocity. he believed these countries should receive something in return. it wasn't good enough for the united states to function like a european colonial power and extract the resources of these countries and those countries receive nothing in return. this was alarming and disturbing to winston churchill and the british because the british had behaved in the middle east in a way that was exclusively extracted without those countries receiving much. occasionally a small number of countries receive something in return but president roosevelt had a more universal idea of reciprocity. look at saudi arabia. in saudi arabia the american oil companies were at that time by and large dividing the proceeds of the oil extraction 50/50. this was not occurring with the oil company in iran or the iraqi petroleum company which was largely dominated by the british in iraq so the british fought the american involvement in the middle east if the americans were going to use saudi arabia as a mode
with pulitzer prize winning author james mcgreger burns of the three roosevelt leader who transformed america. she lives in massachusetts with jim burns and their dog roosevelt. and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, susan is a great friend of the library and me as well. james mcgrayinger burns is the roosevelt scholar. he wrote the first volume of biography. he's in williamstown, massachusetts, and will be watching the program later. we want to send our best to him in williamstown, massachusetts. [applause] so with that, i'm pleased to introduce sue san dunn. -- susan dunn. [applause] >> thank you, bob. it's a great treat and great privilege to be speaking in this magical place. have you ever seen alfred hitchcock's movie "foreign correspondent"? it made the debut in the summer of 1940. in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks him flip what is your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis said the reporter played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that. well to tell you the truth, i haven't given it much thought. you don'
sought to pursue taking america into the second world war. and as michael explained, that changed the course of history as we know in very dramatic ways and in particular the role of america in very dramatic ways. and so the story is a fascinating one of itself. it's told beautifully by michael in a way that takes you into the rooms where the decisions were being made and the conversations were being had that shaped the course of history. but it also has i think important lessons about statecraft, about the way in which presidents of with great difficulty nevertheless can turn the american state and new and profoundly important directions. therefore it has relevance for today as well. michael was the director of the institute for international policy in sydney australia where he does a great job of leading that institution, which has become under his leadership the premier think tank on international policy and australia. as i said, she was formerly year as a senior fellow in the foreign policy program. he previously directed the global issues program at the institute and before t
detroit, america is in big trouble. that's our show. see you next week.d show. tune in. charles: hello, everyone. i am charles payne, it is time to make some money. no more days at the beach and the stock market the toughest month of the year. i will tell you what to look out for in september. and the notion of so-called cheap stocks and the idea we play the market. the worst is the false idea of diversification. more than likely have fallen into that trap. we covered a lot this week and we will give you coverage of the week and months ahead, because it is all coming up on "making your market." stocks fell across the board today, this is not taking long heading into this holiday weekend. especially not with the uncertainty in syria. one of the worst months for stock since last may. utilities and financials led the market ler. the dow lost four and .5%, the s&p 500 lost ov 3%. still the market up easily double digits so far this year so let's get to our panel. i will never mess that up again. and this one, our friend. guys, let's talk a little bit about this month, the worst mont
muhamed who had sworn to love this as an immigrant and army sergeant enlistee to america looks at him and says i love bin laden. i don't need a wad to attack america. i've ex-met number of sleepers that i kid activate. as matthew and he walks out of the restaurant. he said that's the most dangerous man i've ever met and we cannot leave him on the street and yet they left him on the street for x. max number of months. the bombs go off in africa 200 some dead in and they wait a month. they finally arrest him and when they go to rest and guess what they do click they get them in a motel room in new york and they let him go to the bathroom. police 101. for anyone who has ever worked csi miami or dragnet noses as soon as you put the cuffs on somebody you search them or whatever. before they put the cuffs on them they let him go to the bathroom and he later admitted that he flushed key and permission down the toilet including alza were he's location the number two guy in al qaeda and guess what happened to ali muhamed? he is a john doe warrant for weeks and months because they don't want th
of the south asian political dynamic in america. that was my first event at the forum. and those it is right feel most at home here in new york in drew is modest because these books and we have done together starting over one decade ago when we will talk about why the meeting of the world social forum it was a world conference against racism and intolerance and discrimination so why was there such chaos come on the stage of the left? there never seems to be a coherent agenda. we have so many different issues in there and able to fight a united horizon. not a single horizon but some kind of unity but the first time we talk about this i said i would write a book about it be over 100 pages because of durbin was in danger of being forgotten. faugh five all that work that went to put together this major conference was in danger of the loss. i remember we matt and i said i cannot publish his book because it is a book of defeat it does not recognize there is no future for the movement. it is a swan song that never came together. said then went back where is the dynamic? what about in the venues lik
it could affect manufacturing. we kick off a special series called made in america. >> it was a stunning late day capper today to a day of major news affecting the newspapers you read, the websites you visit, the tv networks you watch, and the cable systems you may subscribe to. amazon.com founder and ceo is buying the publishing business of the washington post company. which includes the fames newspaper for $250 million. the post long run by members of the eugene meyer and graham families reached the peak of its fame for tough reporting, during the watergate era. baso says, i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c., and our nation, and the post's values will not change. according to an sec filing, the rest of the company will change its name within 60 days of the deal's closing and investors like the news. they sent shares of washington post higher after hours. >>> another media legend. newsweek, once owned by the washington post company was sold again. this time to ibt media. this is the all digital news publisher of the international business times. the price a
, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting live from washington. denies that the rebels hit his convoy today as enjoying ase, and newfound freedom in pakistan. a bbc story free to this young girl from forced labor and hopefully opened a world of opportunity. >> the biggest change is she can take her place in the classroom and have a chance to learn. this seemed impossible before. their photograph captured faces -- a look at the groundbreaking work of walter evans. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the globe. the syrian government is describing rebel claims that the motorcade was hit today. assassination the attempt happened as he was going to a mosque to celebrate the end of ramadan. video of him unharmed has surfaced. >> no longer do western leaders say that president assad will be gone in months. his forces are making gains in the battlefield, and the war could last for years, leading to a refugee crisis of epic proportions. confidence is his message. on state television today he was shown smiling as he attended prayer
news america reporting from washington. i am jane o'briant. u.s. western inspectors are met with gunfire as they try to reach the site of a chemical attack. there is tough talk against the assad regime. >> make no mistake. president obama there must be accountability for those who would use the world most heinous weapons against the world's most honorable people. >> the high-profile trial draws to a close in china. now he also awaits the verdict. animals have long world rushes arctic oceans. oil and gas are moving and. tonight we look at the potential impact. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. a moral obscenity is what the u.s. secretary of state is accusing the assad regime of perpetrating against its own. today he ramped up the pressure by saying the syrian government was behind the use of chemical weapons last week and has now destroyed the evidence. this comes as inspectors trying to get to the scene of the alleged attack were fired on today. , watched byamascus the world, inspector set up this morning to visit one of the site of
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry that you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. solutionsxpertise and in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington, i am katty kay. says that if his country is attacked he will defend himself. if this happens, what kind of effect may this have? >> the horrific aftermath of an attack carried out allegedly by the syrian government using an incendiary bomb. we have this exclusive report. cuba is back in the ring after banning professional boxing for half a century. the punching is flying once again. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the gl
0's ♪ and chuck hagel says the vote against military intervention in syria will not change america's strategy. hello and welcome, i'm steven in doha and this is al jazeera, coming up, one of the most prominent leader is arrested and they are pulling out from the front line in their battle against the congo army. but first united states is still planning a military response to a suspected gas attack by syrian government forces. it had expected the uk to join a possible coalition but the british parliament voted against any strikes on syria as carolyn malone reports. >> reporter: the resistance outside of the white house against the u.s. attacking syria. and the leaders look at military options and an important ally is against intervening with syria with suspected use of chemical weapons and chuck hagel says the united states still hopes to act with other allies. >> our approach is to continue to find an international coalition that will act together and i think you are seeing a number of countries say publically state their position on the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter:
's it for now from the newsroom. thanks for watching. >> welcome to the week in the americas. coming up, searching for a better life in the u.s. at least nine mexican migrants die in a freight train crash. the train carries thousands looking for a fresh start across the border. 50 years since the famous "i have a dream" speech. how far has been united states come in making that dream a reality? thus, born to be wild. we will need a french woman who is living her american dream -- plus born to be wild. we will meet a french woman who is living her american dream. barack obama may be set to give a green light to a military intervention in syria. images of last week's suspected poison gas attack in damascus sent shockwaves across the world, prompting world leaders -- calls for world leaders to take action. >> he made ending the war in iraq a central promise of his campaign. >> the first thing i will do as president of the united states is bringing into this war and tell the joint chief of staff to start getting our troops out. >> brack obama was reluctant to see american troops on the gro
africa, central and latin america and a majority of asia and discusses the possibilities for an alternative system to emerge. this is about two hours. >> okay. thank you, max. thanks to the brecht forum for hosting us, thanks to all of you for coming out. i am andy, i'm an editor at verso books, and we are the proud publishers of vijay's new book, "poorer nations." i'm going to just briefly introduce vijay. he's going to talk about his book for a bit, then we're going to have a q&a. i'll kick it off with a few questions, then we're going to turn it over to you. and as max said, we have to -- we're hoping to, you know, wait for the mic to get to you, and this is going to be recorded, it'll play on booktv on c-span at some point in the future, which is exciting. i get the feeling that a lot of people here know vijay, but just for those who don't, a little bit of bio about vijay prashad. vijay is the edward saed chair, very appropriate, at the american university of beirut right now. he was formerly and for a long time the george and martha kellner chair of south asian studi
-author with james mcgregor burns of the three leaders who transformed america. she lives in massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note for one thing, susan is a great friend of the library and of me as well, but james mcgregor burns is the dean of roosevelt scholars writing the first two biographies many, many years ago, and he's back in williamstown, massachusetts, and he'll be watching the program later, so we want to send best to him and william penn, massachusetts. [applause] so with that, i'm pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] >> thank you, bob. it's a great treat and great privilege to be speaking in this magical place of hyde park. have you ever seen alfred hitchkoch's movie, "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of these -- [laughter] but you may know them. it made a debut in the summer of 1940. in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question. what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis s
you very much. we're heading i believe >>> this is "world news." tonight, big hit, america's biggest sport will pay nearly $1 billion to football players with brain injuries from the field. but what is the sheer force of one of those blows that will today change the game? >>> countdown to a possible u.s. military strike on syria. president obama is making his case to congress, and we look at the family secrets of the syrian leader. >>> sleeping pills, a wakeup call for americans. a new truth about how many of us are using them and what they do to your body. >>> and behind the headlines tonight, the wife of george zimmerman speaking out, what she says happened the night before trayvon martin was shot. >>> good evening and tonight america's biggest game is generating the biggest headline, a massive settlement between the national football league and thousands of former players. some of them the best players in the game who say they're now living with devastation from all those concussions in the sport they loved. these are the numbers tonight. the nfl promising $765 million i
is an example of what made america great. courage to confront hard shot and abuse, determination to move past and gratitude to a country that made it possible for anyone to succeed and discover one's self worth. .. >> she has also written articles for the "wall street journal," national tribune, los angeles times, "the weekly standard," and others. currently, ms. ma is a vice president of the advisory firm, and she's the policy adviser of the heartland institute, a free market think tank. it is my pleasure to introduce ying ma. [applause] >> thank you, all, thank you so much. rita, thank you very much for the kind introduction. i want to say thanks to all the volunteers who made this event happen, special thanks to rita for all her hard work, coordination in recent months, and, howard, thank you for having me here. it's an honor for me to tell you a bit about my book and my story, but whenever i talk about my book, i have a tendency to think of another author, and that author is president barack obama. as you may recall, the liberal media raved about barack obama's writing abilities in the 20
lyons recounts the introduction of the enlightenment to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its development. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. [laughter] that's always good to hear a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, my wife and i have only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we're based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and i'll probably always miss, and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book and most of my three earlier books as well. but i know that quality of life and the quality of discourse, particularly civic discourse, will be greatly improved. [laughter] and i know, also, that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that i'm speaking here tonight, and he would commend this institution on its civic-mindedness. franklin was known as a projector, that is he loves social projects, and
promised to resolve the crisis, and centered this clip from america's got talent, while she shopped online for pricey jewelry and furniture. the president has assisted he has had popular support. he says he is trying to protect his country and his people. but critics say he only wants to protect his own power. >> so how did he go from a westernized eye doctor to becoming the president of syria using chemical weapons to massacre his own people. i appreciate you both being here. you interbothed bashar and his father -- >> yes, i did. >> what is your impression of this man? >> i interviewed him very early in his term as president. and he was an unknown. whereas his father had been really ruthless, but he was tough, ruthless, clever, and the son was an unknown quantity. >> despite his western leanings because he had been in london for so long -- >> yes, and i think there were some hopes that syria could be broken off from iran at that point, strategically. >> and ed this is not a guy who resembled your saddam hussein and gadhafis. how he has turned out to be very similar to those guys. >> he i
at this point in time in america. >> she is not political, she is not speaking out politically the way that abigail did with her husband. she is not a public political figure speaking out on these things. she has her own private views on some things. her views on politics are more about how people behaved. she is much more interested in everyone conducting themselves properly. even people on her own side. she doesn't like it when people who support the policies that her husband supported have crossed a line in terms of decorum. she is not trying to get out -- she's not an activist. i would not want to say that. >> nearly 100 years until women have the right to vote, we should point out for our younger viewers. what role could they play? where did their power come from? >> there is a coda to this story. just as john quincy became more and more outspoken in his opposition to slavery, and famously played a role in the amistad case. there was something between louisa and the green key sisters, who were pioneering activists and abolitionists of their day. i think she comes as close there as
>>> good morning, america. breaking now, brand-new fires burst across the west. erratic winds, spreading new firestorms from oregon to california right now. the dry, hot weather and lightning making it fierce on the fire lines. >>> the vice president's son, beau biden hospitalized after an alarming finding on a family vacation. a growing medical mystery for the rising political star. and bad, joe biden, by his side this morning. >>> real-life drama for dick van dyke. his car explodes into a fireball, seconds after he escapes thanks to a good samaritan. his thoughts this morning after he narrowly escaped. >> he yanked me out of the car. i was trying to call the dmv. >>> america's first pooch got a little sister at the white house. the brand-new video of bo meeting his new puppy playmate. now, the world meets sunny obama, this morning. >>> and good morning, everyone. boy, sunny is going to keep bo young out there at the white house, isn't she? they play around on the white house lawn yesterday. the first lady tweeting, she's so excited to introduce the newest member of the obama
. >> but experts say it is a stretch for the president to say attacking syria is somehow about keeping america safe. >> the only way that the president can legally strike syria is somehow related it to america's defense. quite frankly, i think he is making a pretty tenuous case. >> the other big question concerns precedent. never before have they attacked another country. when sue dam hussein gassed thousands of turks the world took little action. even the state department admits there is no movement. >> is there aware precedent for an u.s. administration to use the use of chemical weapons as a justification to take some kind of retaliatory action. >> no. not to that specific question. >> so there is no precedent? >> not that i'm aware of, no. >> the closest comparison may be operation dessert fox. in 1998, that's when the u.s. led a four day bombing campaign. in april 1993, when they launched tom hawks into in an attempt to assassinate george hw bush. in an interview with the washington post aspen said. request experts say this isn't about sending a message to syria at all. but to another american
like -- people come from all over america and they have a a talent and they get to show it. and suddenly they become -- their lives change. >> jay: yeah. >> like, candice glover. the recent -- did you see that one? >> jay: she's the one that -- we had her on the show. >> fantastic. fantastic singer. she's like aretha franklin and mahalia jackson. people like that. amazing. >> jay: and you met her, right? >> yeah, i went twice. great fan of hers. >> jay: there you go, look at -- i got to ask you -- >> i'm the one in the middle. [ laughter ] my wife and that's my niece clara. >> jay: i got to ask you about the glasses. >> glasses? you like them? >> jay: yeah. i do like them. kind of a -- >> do you like my socks? how about the socks? >> jay: i do like your socks. [ applause ] >> i'm a fashion -- my wife -- >> jay: your wife what? >> she makes sure i look okay. >> jay: yeah, okay. >> she makes sure -- she points me in the right direction. she makes me walk slowly. she dresses me, and says, "all right, go." [ laughter ] >> jay: did she pick the orange socks? >> she picked the or
solutions in a wide range of industries. >> andan we do for you? now, "bbc world news america." london, i'm from kathy k. the u.s. issues a global travel same al qaedathe threats that will close many american embassies on sunday. iran gets ready for an rouhani.tion of a son -- afghanistan's most first -- first female airplane pilot. >> welcome to our viewers. today the united states issued a global travel alert, citing an al qaeda threat. promptingsame thread the state department to close 21 of its embassies and consulates this sunday, mainly in the muslim world. according to officials, the challenge a potential terrorism is greatest in the middle east and north africa. unrest continues to rattle that region. i spoke with michael singer, a former director of middle east affairs at the white house national security council. you have been in the room when these decisions are made. what is it, the alert of this nature? >> as a government you have information that comes across the radar, which is serious and credible. you are under an obligation to share it publicly. it seems like
to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its develop and. this is a little over one hour. >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. it's always good to get a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, i wife and i only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we are based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book, most of my three or their books as well. but i know the lord of life and quality of discourse will be greatly improved. and i know also that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that if speaking here tonight and that he would commend this institution on its civic mindedness. franklin was what was known as a projector. he loves -- loud projects, social projects. knowledge was a social activity and that was exemplified by the program get here at town hall. i do have to say one thing. i think he would probably frown
, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> president obama has unveiled a new plan to help cut the cost of college. he wants to use a rating system that judges schools on their affordable. colleges are kept tall abou skee plan and are worried it will cost their in
. are what the latest polls. a small percentage want their president to act, but about 60% say america should not stay away -- i mean, it should stay away civil war in syria. but there is a statement that obama should do more for the rebels then just send them on, while almost 80%, i should say 90% to not want america to help the opposition. meanwhile, the medical charity doctors without borders say they received more than 3000 patients suffering when the chemical assault happened. 350 people died, but who was behind the attack is still hard to verify. this is the rebel group saying they have got their largest shipment of weapons in the past three days, with the u.s. military buildup in the region. one man says this is not a coincidence. >> we have to see these elements as connected, as related to each other, as a strategy to try to reverse the course that the war has taken, where the government has made very significant gains, and to try to stifle the effort to bring down the independent government of syria. there are a lot of weapons out there in the world. there are rebel groups at this po
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
-jazeera america sports. [[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. can you say stocktopussy? there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, could striking workers in greece delay your retirement? i'm here to make the connections to your money real. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> welcome back. i am stephanie sy. these are our stories at this hour. >> the wildfire in yosemite national spark threatening the power grid prompting the governor of california to declare an emergency. t >>> the suspected chemical attack has the u.s. considering possib
almost quite obviously referred to in that interview, if america's core national interests are at stake? >> let me go to paul, who is in capitol hill, and paul, of course, many members of congress back home on recess that's why they have this conference call, have you heard anything tonight? >> well, that's right. there is mounting frustration what we are hearing. mounting bipartisan frustration, they are worried that any attack can draw the u.s. further into the syrian conflict. and they are also frustrated about the lack of an end game. about a clear policy for a way out. >> paul, do we know anything about the briefing at the white house that they had with congress? have you hear anything about that. >> they have heard there are problems with that video conference. a problem securing enough video conference lines so the conference had to be declassified on ur classified report. president obama said it wouldn't be regime change or even changes the civil war. they are trying to keep it out of the hands of terrorists. >> we know the ashad regime maintains stock piles. we have indicated o
was an intern at bank of america in london, worked eight all-nighers in two weeks. we have more. >> the signs were there, but for the student, it was too late. the young student from germany was nearing the end of his internship at bank of america's investment on merle lunch when he died at his home. he had reportedly just worked 72 hours when he collapsed in the shower. his profile on a social media website had an ambitious streak, a pressure to outdo a fellow worker for a position. >> those individuals are so driven, so key to get a job, that they push themselves and in the end, push themselves over the edge. it's up to the leader of the team to see what's happening and even if these individuals keep volunteering for work, which some of them will do, to turn around and say no, you've done enough, you node to go and have some rest. >> an internship at a high pro tile company is seen as a valuable recruitment doing, putting pressure on interns to accel. many say interns do work punishing schedules in the banking industry, offering a glimpse of what's to item if they gain employment in the pro
of the top production companies in hollywood. today it is a winner. how about going forward? abe of america intern died after pulling several all nighters. how many hours some of the junior players are asked to work. charlie gasparino on this story. we will be right back. ♪ mantra? always go the extra mile. to treat my low testosterone, i did my research. my doctor and i went with axiron, the only underarm low t treatment. axiron can restore t levels to normal in about 2 weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as uneected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and meditions. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptom decreased sperm count; ankle, feet or body swelling; enlarg or painful breasts; problems breathing
.... a government cure for america's drug problem. and... the heat is on .. how the late summer burst of sun is affecting u.s. crops. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas good morning! it's wednesday, august 28. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: the market in crisis mode over syria. the volitility index raced up 12%.. as fear and anxiety strike stocks. the dow plunged in a triple digit fall. the nasdaq had its worst point drop of the year.. and the s&p broke through technical support. gold futures pushed up $23 and oil spiked close to $109 dollars per barrel. jcp posted a record trading day with near 100million shares changing hands. it follows a report-- activist investor bill ackman sold his entire stake the retailer. the stock closed down 18 cents around $13.00. and walgreen is accused of overcharging customers and using false advertising. the lawsuit was filed yesteray by the attornery general of missouri. walgreen will fight the charges. for more on the market reaction to syria, larry shover of sfg alternatives joins us. goo
. almost every day virtually every company missed the top line. corporate america crafty, they find a way to make the bottom line. does not take away the legitimacy of these earnings? >> to some degree we would like to see the bottom line improvement with topline growth and eventually you will have to go there. as you well know, corporate earnings are at an all-time high, revenues are at an all-time high, are we disappointed with the growth rate? yeah, a little bit. we need a little bit of time to go up from here. it will take continued help from the consumer, capital out of corporate america, continue less bad news out of europe and some combing in the emerging market especially china. we will get a mix of that to get some better revenue growth. it will not set any records, but we will get a little better. charles: we saw some answers to your china part there. i think that is getting better. a lot has that europe is going pretty good at a lot of diverse sectors. i think the question, bob, the u.s. consumer has not taken the bait. they have learned a very powerful lesson, putting off debt
security fellow with new america foundation, thank you so much for joining us this morning. as the quest considers how to respond, disturbing new images. this is video of what is said to be a fire bomb attack near a school in the northwestern part of syria. it may have contained may palm that sticks to the skin and causes severe burns. a doctor says at least seven people were killed and dozens were injuries. al jazeera cannot independently confirm those reports. >> asaad's regime has plameed the august 21st chemical attack on rebels. on friday, the syrian government called the u.s. intelligence on the use of chemical weapons fabrication and lies. keep it here to al jazeera for continuing coverage on the crisis in syria, you can also stay up to date on our website aljazeera.com. children in unmarked graves may finally have their stories told. exhume makeses are underway in an attempt to uncover their long held secrets. beautiful weather in yosemite national park, we will tell you why that sunshine is not helping firefighters dealing with a run away wild fire burning the national treasure.
>>> good morning, america. breaking overnight, u.n. weapons inspectors leave syria. opening the window for a strike. >>> u.s. warships armed with hundreds of tomahawk cruise missiles, now in place. >> we are looking at the possibility of a limited, narrow act. >> all this, while we're hearing about a new threat to america on the home front. >>> shot at school. a high school thrown into chaos, after a student is shot during a fire drill. >> a student has been hit. >> it's the second terrifying shooting in a school in two weeks. and you'll hear another hero's story that may have kept hundreds of students safe. >>> busted. lamar odom, star of the nba and reality tv, arrested for drunk driving. amid rumors of drug and marital problems, is this a cry for help from khloe kardashian's husband? >>> and honest answer. an ex-con allegedly takes a taxi to try to rob three banks in a row before he's nabbed. and this morning, he has a very funny exit line. >> are you sorry you did it? >> no. i'm sorry i got caught. >> got to love an honest criminal. >>> good morning. and happy labor day
on the country did states of america coming out of the closet and singing here is how i think the social war should be taught. should be taught in terms of people understanding on what would have happened if the war turned out differently. >> up next on the special weeknight edition of book tv. author national book award winning author nathaniel philbrick -- he discusses this in massachusetts for 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it's an honor to be introduced by a fellow nantucketer both of our kids were educated by them and it is great to see you here in brookline and it's wonderful to be in the coolidge center theater with this great bookstore and co-sponsored with the massachusetts historical society, which has been an institution that has been absolutely essential to my life as a historian. i sometimes sort of feel like i've taken up residence in the archives there, and every book i've done there has been a central information that has come from there but among the more so than bunker hill. one of the characters i delve into, the papers are there at what we call the mhs and it is an
also didn't demand that america somehow give us preferences in the form of racial and ethnic quota. in fact, being asian in california pretty much meant we didn't receive any of those quota or preferences. but racial quota and preferences were dolled out quite lavishly to sons and daughters of dennists, doctors, and other middle class professionals who belonged to racial categories that were far more in fashion in our society. regardless, in the end we prevailed. we prevailed over the welfare state. we got out. certainly we didn't do it alone. the kindness of the american people has always impressed me. i think it's something that impresses all immigrants to this country. and we remain grateful to those who offered a helping hand and a warm smile. repeatedly, when i was reading a piece in the "the wall street journal" written by governor jeb bush, i thought of my family's journey out of the ghetto. he said "today the sad real city if you're born poor, if you're parents didn't go to college, if you don't know your father, and if english is not spoken at home, then the odds are stack
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